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AJE IJO Series: Rivers of Nine

‘AJE IJO’ Short Dance Film Series centers the humanity, resiliency, vulnerability of black & African diasporic people

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Title: AJE IJO Series: Rivers of Nine

Producer/Director: Kiana Harris

Cast: Zahre Garrett, Alexander Jackson

Genre: PVIFF Short Films

Runtime: 19:56 minutes

‘AJE IJO’ Short Dance Film Series centers the humanity, resiliency, vulnerability of black & African diasporic people [of all genders], interrogating the western gender binary and interrupting accompanying notions of masculinity and femininity. Our individual and collective complexity, survival, thriving, and ultimately our healing as a people are at stake, and compel the elaboration of this narrative. To this end, the film elicits elements of spiritual cosmologies of the African diaspora, particularly those that emerge from the Yoruba divine consciousness, Ifa, and the Orisa (deities) that comprise it. 

Director Biography - Kiana Harris

A native of Anchorage, Alaska Kiana created and debuted her first dance film entitled “DIVINE” part l and ll summer of 2016 in Seattle, Washington and is available on Vimeo.

Her dance films were also featured in Langston Hughes African American Film Festival Risk/Reward Festival, SIFF 1 Reel Film Festival at Bumbershoot. Her latest debut, AJE IJO Dance Film Series screened at Artist of Color Expo & Symposium, Translation Film Festival and On The Boards. Her mission as a filmmaker is to reclaim imagery in a non-exploitative representation from a black woman’s lens, and it be one of many tools to drive black liberation.

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